WMKY

Christopher Intagliata

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Every year, Monarch butterflies from all over the Western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and '90s, more than a million made the trip. Lately, those numbers have fallen.

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Scientists have found something strange has been happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.

Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were also shrinking in size.

"We found that size is not only shrinking for those sensitive species — it was declining for everyone," said researcher Vitek Jirinec of Louisiana State University.

Jirinec's findings are contained in a new study published in the journal Science Advances last Friday.

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In recent years, scientists found something strange was happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon. Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were shrinking in size.

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The United States has seen a decline in cases and hospitalizations since the summer's delta surge — but the decline is declining.

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Can a name save lives? The city of Seville in Spain is betting it can.

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Yesterday, the mayor announced a new program - the world's first to give official names to severe heat waves.

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Wildlife biologist Greg LeClair has been obsessed with amphibians since he was a kid, when one rainy day, a black and yellow spotted salamander stumbled into his driveway in Maine.

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Simone Biles, already the most decorated gymnast in history, has surpassed expectations again. On Saturday, she performed a move considered so dangerous that no other woman has ever attempted it in competition.

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This story is part of an NPR series, We Hold These Truths, on American democracy.

Last summer, DonnaLee Norrington had a dream about owning a home. Not the figurative kind, but a literal dream, as she slept in the rental studio apartment in South Los Angeles that she was sharing with a friend.

At around 2 a.m., Norrington remembers, "God said to me, 'Why don't you get a mortgage that doesn't move?' And in my head I knew that meant a fixed mortgage."

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A recent study of mummified parrots found in a high-altitude desert region in South America suggests to researchers that, as far back as some 900 years ago, people went to arduous lengths to transport the prized birds across vast and complex trade routes.

The remains of more than two dozen scarlet macaws and Amazon parrots were found at five different sites in northern Chile's arid Atacama Desert — far from their home in the Amazon rainforest.

So how did they get there?

Scientists are inching one step closer toward redefining the length of a second.

To do that, they're using atomic clocks.

Atomic clocks, which look like a jumble of lasers and wires, work by tapping into the natural oscillation of atoms, with each atom "ticking" at a different speed.

Modern conveniences including cellphones, the Internet and GPS are all made possible through the ticking of atomic clocks.

Penguins are known for huddling on Antarctic ice, or marching across windswept expanses of the frozen continent. But there are at least 18 species of penguins populating the Southern Hemisphere — and many don't fit that frigid stereotype.

There are actually only two species of penguin that really love ice, says Grant Ballard, chief science officer of Point Blue Conservation Science in Petaluma, Calif. Other species, like the Galapagos penguin, perch on dark volcanic rock, and can endure blasting hot air temperatures of 100 degrees.

Everyone Needs A Buddy. Even Sharks

Aug 13, 2020

Sharks are often maligned as Hollywood monsters, the lone wolves lurking in the deep, hunting for prey. (Cue Jaws theme song).

But that caricature of sharks is increasingly out of step with what scientists are learning about the animals. Instead, they say, some species of sharks are social creatures who return day after day to a group of the same fellow sharks.