WMKY

blood donation

Healthline

The American Red Cross continues to experience a severe blood shortage that is negatively affecting blood product availability across the country.

Donors of all blood types – especially type O – are urged to make an appointment to give now and help ensure hospital shelves are stocked with blood products over the Fourth of July holiday and beyond. 

Kentucky Blood Center

Despite the ongoing pandemic, Kentucky hospitals continue to transfuse blood to patients at higher rates than normal. Kentucky Blood Center, which provides blood to 70+ Kentucky hospitals relies on volunteer donors to roll up their sleeves as often as possible to help meet the needs of neighbors battling injury and illness.

WVXU

Kentucky Blood Center wants to infuse donors’ summer with a little cash, so the nonprofit is giving away two $500 gift cards each week for a total of $16,000 awarded through September 18.

All donors who register to donate at a KBC donor center or mobile blood drive each week will be entered to win one of two $500 gift cards.

The promotion starts May 30. Donors will be entered into the week’s drawing each time they give during the summer. In addition, each registered donor will receive this great patriotic “Be a Hero” shirt (while supplies last).

Kentucky Blood Center

Kentucky Blood Center wants to infuse donors’ summer with a little cash, so the nonprofit is giving away two $500 gift cards each week for a total of $16,000 awarded through September 18.

All donors who register to donate at a KBC donor center or mobile blood drive each week will be entered to win one of two $500 gift cards. The promotion starts May 30.

Donors will be entered into the week’s drawing each time they give during the summer. In addition, each registered donor will receive this great Team Kentucky shirt (while supplies last).

BBC

In times of need, people come together to support one another. The American Red Cross is asking for healthy individuals to step up to help patients experiencing health crises by donating blood or platelets.

As COVID-19 continues to affect everyday life, people may not be thinking about blood donation. But blood and platelets are needed daily to help patients battling disease and facing the unexpected. Donating blood is an easy way to care for each other and ensure hospitals have the blood products patients rely on.

KCRG

Kentucky Blood Center is reminding Kentuckians of the importance of donating blood, especially as elective surgeries resume this week at the 70 hospitals KBC serves across the state. 

Register Citizen

As Coronavirus spreads in Kentucky and across the United States, Kentucky Blood Center is urging healthy individuals to donate blood to ensure an adequate blood supply.

“Emerging illness which could impact the blood supply is always at top of mind at blood centers,” said Dr. Dennis Williams, Medical Director at Kentucky Blood Center. “There is no known risk of transmitting the virus through blood, but the greater concern is the loss of donations due to drive cancellations, social distancing, and possible quarantines.”

Summer blood donors needed in Kentucky

Jul 12, 2018
Kenny Holston, Flickr

With the busy July 4 holiday week over, emergency officials are hoping Kentuckians have some time to help save lives in their community.

The Kentucky Blood Center serves 90 counties and provides blood to over 70 hospitals. However, the center's vice president of marketing, Martha Osborne, says maintaining an adequate supply during the summer months is challenging.

Kentucky Patients Depend on Blood Donors

Apr 26, 2017
kybloodcenter.org

Blood transfusion are need by many Kentuckians.  Cancer patients, for instance, often require blood transfusions to help rebuild their blood supply during cancer treatments.  Trauma patients need blood immediately to get them stable.  Those with blood disorders like sickle cell anemia may also require transfusions, and organ transplants and other surgeries can’t happen unless blood is readily available.

O Negative Blood Donors Needed

Aug 6, 2013
NY Daily News

The significant need for ‘negative’ blood type donations persists across Kentucky.  The Kentucky Blood Center’s Martha Osborne says only about 15 percent of the general population carries a negative blood type, adding only about seven percent are ‘O’ negative.  She says the blood center serves some 70 hospitals in central and eastern Kentucky.