WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

Podcast Link

britannica.com

January 21, 2020 -- John Fitch was an American inventor, clockmaker, entrepreneur and engineer. He was most famous for operating the first steamboat service in the United States. The first boat was 45 feet long it was tested on the Delaware river by John Fitch and his design assistant Steven Pagano.

January 17, 2020 -- Charles Brockden Brown was an American novelist, historian, and editor of the Early National period. He is generally regarded by scholars as the most important American novelist before James Fenimore Cooper.

classic-monsters.com

January 15, 2020 -- Ernest Thesiger was an English stage and film actor. He is noted for his performance as Doctor Septimus Pretorius in James Whale's film, Bride of Frankenstein. 

britannica.com

January 14, 2020 -- John Roderigo Dos Passos was an American novelist, most notable for his U.S.A. trilogy. Born in Chicago, Dos Passos graduated from Harvard College in 1916. He traveled widely as a young man, visiting Europe and the Middle East, where he learned about literature, art, and architecture.

November 22, 2019 -- Thanksgiving 2019

www.louvre.fr

November 21, 2019 -- François-Marie Arouet, known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his criticism of Christianity, especially the Roman Catholic Church, as well as his advocacy of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state.

npr.org

November 20, 2019 -- Robert Carlyle Byrd was an American politician who served as a United States Senator from West Virginia for over 51 years, from 1959 until his death in 2010. A member of the Democratic Party, Byrd previously served as a U.S. Representative from 1953 until 1959.

britannica.com

November 19, 2019 -- American poet, teacher, novelist, and a leading exponent of the New Criticism. In both his criticism and his poetry, he emphasized the writer’s need for a tradition to adhere to; he found his tradition in the culture of the conservative, agrarian South and, later, in Roman Catholicism, to which he converted in 1950.

britannica.com

November 18, 2019 -- Percy Wyndham Lewis was an English writer, painter and critic. He was a co-founder of the Vorticist movement in art, and edited the literary magazine of the Vorticists, BLAST.

britannica.com

November 14, 2019 -- Joseph McCarthy dominated the U.S. political climate in the early 1950s through his sensational but unproven charges of communist subversion in high government circles. In 1954, in a rare move, his Senate colleagues officially censured him for unbecoming conduct.

artuk.org

November 13, 2019 -- Edward III was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death; he is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. 

biography.com

November 12, 2019 -- French sculptor Auguste Rodin is known for creating several iconic works, including "The Age of Bronze," "The Thinker," "The Kiss" and "The Burghers of Calais."

britannica.com

November 8, 2019 -- English astronomer and mathematician who was the first to calculate the orbit of a comet later named after him. He is also noted for his role in the publication of Isaac Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica.

biography.com

November 7, 2019 -- Leon Trotsky's revolutionary activity as a young man spurred his first of several ordered exiles to Siberia. He waged Russia's 1917 revolution alongside Vladimir Lenin. As commissar of war in the new Soviet government, he helped defeat forces opposed to Bolshevik control. As the Soviet government developed, he engaged in a power struggle against Joseph Stalin, which he lost, leading to his exile again and, eventually, his murder.

www.nosweatshakespeare.com

November 6, 2019 -- Thomas Kyd was an English playwright, the author of The Spanish Tragedy, and one of the most important figures in the development of Elizabethan drama.

spartacus-educational.com/

November 5, 2019 -- Charles Gordon MacArthur was an American playwright, screenwriter and 1935 winner of the Academy Award for Best Story.

IMDb

November 4, 2019 -- Ian Wolfe was an American character actor with around 400 film and television roles. Until 1934, he worked in the theatre. That year, he also turned to film and later television, as a character actor. His career lasted seven decades and included many classics; his last screen credit was in 1990.

britannica.com

November 1, 2019 -- Sholem Asch was a Polish-Jewish novelist, dramatist, and essayist in the Yiddish language who settled in the United States. 

viaLibri

October 31, 2019 -- Franz Müller, was a German tailor who was hanged for the murder of Thomas Briggs, the first killing on a British train. The case caught the imagination of the public due to increasing safety fears about rail travel at the time, and the pursuit of Müller across the Atlantic Ocean to New York by Scotland Yard.

britannica.com

October 30, 2019 -- André Marie Chénier was a French poet of Greek and Franco-Levantine origin, associated with the events of the French Revolution of which he was a victim. His sensual, emotive poetry marks him as one of the precursors of the Romantic movement. 

Public Domain

October 29, 2019 -- Harriet Powers was an African-American slave, folk artist, and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts. Only two of her quilts are known to have survived: Bible Quilt 1886 and Pictorial Quilt 1898.

Public Domain

October 28, 2019 -- Eileen Shanahan was an Irish poet. Her best-known poem, The Three Children, has been republished five times since its original publication in The Atlantic Monthly in 1929, and was included in the Oxford Book of Irish Verse.

Country Music Hall of Fame

October 25, 2019 -- Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon, known professionally as her stage character Minnie Pearl, was an American country comedian who appeared at the Grand Ole Opry for more than 50 years and on the television show Hee Haw from 1969 to 1991.

IMDb

October 24, 2019 -- F. Murray Abraham is an American actor. He became widely known during the 1980s after winning an Oscar for his leading role as Antonio Salieri in the drama film Amadeus. Abraham also won a Golden Globe and received a BAFTA Award nomination for the role.

britannica.com

October 23, 2019 -- Pierre Athanase Larousse was a French grammarian, lexicographer and encyclopaedist. He published many of the outstanding educational and reference works of 19th-century France, including the 15 volume Grand dictionnaire universel du XIXe siècle.

www.amethystrecovery.org

October 22, 2019 -- Swedish physician who coined the word alcoholism and was the first to define it as a chronic, relapsing disease.

NY Times

October 21, 2019 -- George Junius Stinney, Jr., was an African American youth convicted, at age 14, of murdering two white girls, ages 7 and 11, in his hometown of Alcolu, South Carolina. He was executed by electric chair in June of that year.

biography.com

October 18, 2019 -- Considered by many as the "father of rock 'n' roll," Chuck Berry had early exposure to music at school and church. As a teen, he was sent to prison for three years for armed robbery. He began producing hits in the 1950s, including 1958's "Johnny B. Goode," and had his first No. 1 hit in 1972 with "My Ding-a-Ling." With his clever lyrics and distinctive sounds, Berry became one of the most influential figures in the history of rock music.

britannica.com

October 17, 2019 -- Pope John Paul I was head of the Catholic Church and sovereign of the Vatican City from 26 August 1978 to his death 33 days later. He was the first pope to have been born in the 20th century. 

britannica.com

October 16, 2019 -- Michael Collins was an Irish revolutionary, soldier, and politician who was a leading figure in the early-20th-century Irish struggle for independence. He was Chairman of the Provisional Government of the Irish Free State from January 1922 until his assassination in August 1922.

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