WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

Podcast Link

britannica.com

March 10, 2020 -- Leon Bismark "Bix" Beiderbecke was an American jazz cornetist, pianist, and composer. Beiderbecke was one of the most influential jazz soloists of the 1920s, a cornet player noted for an inventive lyrical approach and purity of tone. 

britannica.com

March 9, 2020 -- Amasa Leland Stanford was an American industrialist and politician. He is the founder of Stanford University. Migrating to California from New York at the time of the Gold Rush, he became a successful merchant and wholesaler, and continued to build his business empire.

britannica.com

February 28, 2020 -- Molly Picon was an American actress of stage, screen and television, as well as a lyricist and dramatic story-teller. She was first and foremost a star in Yiddish theatre and film, but in time, she turned to English-language productions.

npr.org

February 27, 2020 -- Marian Anderson was an American singer of classical music and spirituals. Music critic Alan Blyth said: "Her voice was a rich, vibrant contralto of intrinsic beauty." She performed in concert and recital in major music venues and with famous orchestras throughout the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1965.

emmys.com

February 26, 2020 -- William Clement Frawley was an American stage entertainer and screen and television actor best known for playing landlord Fred Mertz in the American television sitcom I Love Lucy and Bub in the television comedy series My Three Sons.

britannica.com

February 25, 2020 -- John Anthony Burgess Wilson, who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer and composer. Although Burgess was predominantly a comic writer, his dystopian satire A Clockwork Orange remains his best-known novel.

IMDb

February 24, 2020 -- Marjorie Main was the stage name of Mary Tomlinson, who was an American character actress and singer of the Classical Hollywood period, best known as a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player in the 1940s and 1950s, and for her role as Ma Kettle in ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies.

britannica.com

February 21, 2020 -- Army officer and statesman who was the storm centre of Mexico’s politics during such events as the Texas Revolution (1835–36) and the Mexican-American War (1846–48).

irishcentral.com

February 20, 2020 -- William Carleton was an Irish writer and novelist. He is best known for his Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, a collection of ethnic sketches of the stereotypical Irishman. 

IMDb

February 19, 2020 -- Lee Marvin was an American film and television actor. Known for his distinctive voice and premature white hair, Marvin initially appeared in supporting roles, mostly villains, soldiers, and other hardboiled characters. 

britannica.com

February 18, 2020 -- Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta was an Italian physicist, chemist, and pioneer of electricity and power who is credited as the inventor of the electric battery and the discoverer of methane.

J.D. Reeder

Merriam-Webster defines “milestone” as a landmark event or “a significant point in development.”

Marking a significant milestone, Morehead State Public Radio listeners have enjoyed more than 1200 episodes of “The Reader’s Notebook,” a locally-produced weekday almanac on the people and events of science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts. 

biography.com

February 14, 2020 -- Frederick Douglass was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. 

journalism-history.org

February 13, 2020 -- Frederick reported news for the American Broadcasting Company (ABC; 1946–53), and covered the United Nations for ABC, beginning in the late 1940s, and for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), which she joined in 1953. After retiring from NBC radio and television news in 1974 she commented on foreign affairs for National Public Radio. In 1976 she became the first woman journalist to moderate a presidential candidates’ debate when she presided over a televised forum featuring Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter.

history.com

February 12, 2020 -- General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley was a senior officer of the United States Army during and after World War II. Bradley was the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and oversaw the U.S. military's policy-making in the Korean War.

Chicago History Museum

February 11, 2020 -- Margaret Vinci Heldt was an American hairstylist, best known as the creator of the beehive hairstyle.

gramophone.co.uk

February 10, 2020 -- Mary Violet Leontyne Price is an American soprano. Born and raised in Laurel, Mississippi, she rose to international acclaim in the 1950s and 1960s, and was the first African American to become a leading performer at the Metropolitan Opera, and one of the most popular American classical singers of her generation. 

randomhouse.com

February 7, 2020 -- Gay Talese is an American writer. As a journalist for The New York Times and Esquire magazine during the 1960s, Talese helped to define literary journalism. Talese's most famous articles are about Joe DiMaggio and Frank Sinatra.

britannica.com

February 6, 2020 -- Sir Henry Irving, one of the most famous of English actors, the first of his profession to be knighted (1895) for services to the stage. He was also a celebrated theatre manager and the professional partner of the actress Ellen Terry for 24 years (1878–1902).

britannica.com

February 5, 2020 -- A member of the Democratic Party, Stevenson served in numerous positions in the federal government during the 1930s and 1940s, including the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA), Federal Alcohol Administration, Department of the Navy, and the State Department. In 1945, he served on the committee that created the United Nations, and he was a member of the initial U.S. delegations to the UN.

biography.com

February 4, 2020 -- Betty Friedan was an American feminist writer and activist. A leading figure in the women's movement in the United States, her 1963 book The Feminine Mystique is often credited with sparking the second wave of American feminism in the 20th century.

britannica.com

February 3, 2020 -- Sidney Clopton Lanier was an American musician, poet and author. He served in the Confederate States Army as a private, worked on a blockade-running ship for which he was imprisoned, taught, worked at a hotel where he gave musical performances, was a church organist, and worked as a lawyer.

npr.org

January 31, 2020 -- Norman Kingsley Mailer was an American novelist, journalist, essayist, playwright, film-maker, actor, and liberal political activist. His novel The Naked and the Dead was published in 1948, and brought him early and wide renown.

biography.com

January 30, 2020 -- Vanessa Redgrave is an English actress of stage, screen, and television, and a political activist. She is a 2003 American Theatre Hall of Fame inductee, and received the 2010 BAFTA Fellowship.

biography.com

January 29, 2020 -- Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was a Russian playwright and short-story writer who is considered to be among the greatest writers of short fiction in history. His career as a playwright produced four classics, and his best short stories are held in high esteem by writers and critics.

biography.com

January 28, 2020 -- Robert Franklin Stroud, known as the "Birdman of Alcatraz", was a convicted murderer, American federal prisoner and author who has been cited as one of the most notorious criminals in the United States.

britannica.com

January 27, 2020 -- Edward John Smith was a British merchant navy officer. He served as master of numerous White Star Line vessels. He was the captain of the RMS Titanic, and perished when the ship sank on its maiden voyage.

britannica.com

January 24, 2020 -- Edith Wharton was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, and designer. Wharton drew upon her insider's knowledge of the upper class New York "aristocracy" to realistically portray the lives and morals of the Gilded Age. She was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1921.

January 23, 2020 -- Joseph Nathan Kane was an American non-fiction writer and journalist, who wrote what the Chronicle of Higher Education calls "some of the most widely used reference works in publishing history."

January 22, 2020 -- Luke L. Short was an American Old West gunfighter, cowboy, U.S. Army scout, dispatch rider, gambler, boxing promoter and saloon owner. He survived numerous gunfights, the most famous of which were against Charlie Storms in Tombstone, Arizona Territory and against Jim Courtright in Fort Worth, Texas.

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