WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

Podcast Link

IMDb

August 24, 2020 -- Harold John Smith was an American actor and voice actor, who is credited in over 300 film and television productions. He was best known for his role as Otis Campbell, the town drunk on CBS's The Andy Griffith Show and for voicing Owl in the first four original Winnie the Pooh shorts (the first three of which were combined into the feature film The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh) and later The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.

Mary Ellen Matthews/NBC

August 20, 2020 -- Albert Lincoln Roker Jr. is an American weather forecaster, journalist, television personality, actor, and author. He is the current weather anchor on NBC's Today. 

The British Library

August 19, 2020 -- John Dryden was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was appointed England's first Poet Laureate in 1668. He is seen as dominating the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. 

Pinterest

August 18, 2020 -- Shelley Winters was an American actress whose career spanned almost six decades. She appeared in numerous films, and won Academy Awards for The Diary of Anne Frank and A Patch of Blue, and received nominations for A Place in the Sun and The Poseidon Adventure.

IMDb

August 17, 2020 -- Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. was an American lawyer, politician, and businessman. He served as a United States Congressman from New York from 1949 to 1955 and as the first chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from 1965 to 1966. Roosevelt also ran for Governor of New York twice.

history.com

March 31, 2020 -- On March 31, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris in a ceremony presided over by Gustave Eiffel, the tower’s designer, and attended by French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, a handful of other dignitaries, and 200 construction workers.

discogs.com

March 30, 2020 -- Jethro Tull are a British rock band formed in Blackpool, Lancashire, in 1967. Initially playing blues rock and jazz fusion, the band later developed their sound to incorporate elements of hard rock and folk to forge a progressive rock signature.

biography.com

March 27, 2020 -- Born in Fife, Scotland, on November 19, 1600, the second son born to James VI of Scotland and Anne of Denmark, Charles I ascended to the throne in 1625. His reign was marked by religious and political strife that led to civil war. The opposing force, led by Oliver Cromwell, defeated Charles's royalist forces and the king was beheaded in London, England, on January 30, 1649.

daytondailynews.com

March 26, 2020 -- The Great Dayton Flood of 1913 resulted from flooding by the Great Miami River reaching Dayton, Ohio, and the surrounding area, causing the greatest natural disaster in Ohio history. In response, the General Assembly passed the Vonderheide Act to enable the formation of conservancy districts.

britannica.com

March 25, 2020 -- Sir David Lean was an English film director, producer, screenwriter and editor. Widely considered as one of the most influential directors of all time, Lean was mostly famous for his large-scale epics such as The Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India.

History and Women

March 23, 2020 -- Fannie Merritt Farmer was an American/Canadian culinary expert whose Boston Cooking-School Cook Book became a widely used culinary text.

March 13, 2020 -- Friday the 13th

www.irishcentral.com

March 12, 2020 -- Charles Cunningham Boycott was an English land agent whose ostracism by his local community in Ireland gave the English language the verb "to boycott". He had served in the British Army 39th Foot, which brought him to Ireland. 

englishmonarchs.co.uk

March 11, 2020 -- Henry Benedict Thomas Edward Maria Clement Francis Xavier Stuart, Cardinal Duke of York was a Roman Catholic cardinal, as well as the fourth and final Jacobite heir to claim the thrones of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland publicly. 

britannica.com

March 10, 2020 -- Leon Bismark "Bix" Beiderbecke was an American jazz cornetist, pianist, and composer. Beiderbecke was one of the most influential jazz soloists of the 1920s, a cornet player noted for an inventive lyrical approach and purity of tone. 

britannica.com

March 9, 2020 -- Amasa Leland Stanford was an American industrialist and politician. He is the founder of Stanford University. Migrating to California from New York at the time of the Gold Rush, he became a successful merchant and wholesaler, and continued to build his business empire.

britannica.com

February 28, 2020 -- Molly Picon was an American actress of stage, screen and television, as well as a lyricist and dramatic story-teller. She was first and foremost a star in Yiddish theatre and film, but in time, she turned to English-language productions.

npr.org

February 27, 2020 -- Marian Anderson was an American singer of classical music and spirituals. Music critic Alan Blyth said: "Her voice was a rich, vibrant contralto of intrinsic beauty." She performed in concert and recital in major music venues and with famous orchestras throughout the United States and Europe between 1925 and 1965.

emmys.com

February 26, 2020 -- William Clement Frawley was an American stage entertainer and screen and television actor best known for playing landlord Fred Mertz in the American television sitcom I Love Lucy and Bub in the television comedy series My Three Sons.

britannica.com

February 25, 2020 -- John Anthony Burgess Wilson, who published under the name Anthony Burgess, was an English writer and composer. Although Burgess was predominantly a comic writer, his dystopian satire A Clockwork Orange remains his best-known novel.

IMDb

February 24, 2020 -- Marjorie Main was the stage name of Mary Tomlinson, who was an American character actress and singer of the Classical Hollywood period, best known as a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player in the 1940s and 1950s, and for her role as Ma Kettle in ten Ma and Pa Kettle movies.

britannica.com

February 21, 2020 -- Army officer and statesman who was the storm centre of Mexico’s politics during such events as the Texas Revolution (1835–36) and the Mexican-American War (1846–48).

irishcentral.com

February 20, 2020 -- William Carleton was an Irish writer and novelist. He is best known for his Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry, a collection of ethnic sketches of the stereotypical Irishman. 

IMDb

February 19, 2020 -- Lee Marvin was an American film and television actor. Known for his distinctive voice and premature white hair, Marvin initially appeared in supporting roles, mostly villains, soldiers, and other hardboiled characters. 

britannica.com

February 18, 2020 -- Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Volta was an Italian physicist, chemist, and pioneer of electricity and power who is credited as the inventor of the electric battery and the discoverer of methane.

J.D. Reeder

Merriam-Webster defines “milestone” as a landmark event or “a significant point in development.”

Marking a significant milestone, Morehead State Public Radio listeners have enjoyed more than 1200 episodes of “The Reader’s Notebook,” a locally-produced weekday almanac on the people and events of science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts. 

biography.com

February 14, 2020 -- Frederick Douglass was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. 

journalism-history.org

February 13, 2020 -- Frederick reported news for the American Broadcasting Company (ABC; 1946–53), and covered the United Nations for ABC, beginning in the late 1940s, and for the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), which she joined in 1953. After retiring from NBC radio and television news in 1974 she commented on foreign affairs for National Public Radio. In 1976 she became the first woman journalist to moderate a presidential candidates’ debate when she presided over a televised forum featuring Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter.

history.com

February 12, 2020 -- General of the Army Omar Nelson Bradley was a senior officer of the United States Army during and after World War II. Bradley was the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and oversaw the U.S. military's policy-making in the Korean War.

Chicago History Museum

February 11, 2020 -- Margaret Vinci Heldt was an American hairstylist, best known as the creator of the beehive hairstyle.

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