WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays (M-TH) at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

Podcast Link

britannica.com

May 11, 2021 -- The Waltz is a highly popular ballroom dance evolved from the Ländler in the 18th century. Characterized by a step, slide, and step in 3/4 time, the waltz, with its turning, embracing couples, at first shocked polite society. It became the ballroom dance par excellence of the 19th century, however, and tenaciously maintained its popularity in the 20th. Its variations include the rapid, whirling Viennese waltz and the gliding, dipping Boston.

history.com

May 10, 2021 -- May 10, 1940: Winston Churchill, First Lord of the Admiralty, is called to replace Neville Chamberlain as British prime minister following the latter’s resignation after losing a confidence vote in the House of Commons. On May 13, in his first speech before the House of Commons, Prime Minister Churchill declared that “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat” and offered an outline of his bold plans for British resistance.

merriam-webster.com

May 6, 2021 -- A Way with Words 

  • A 1
  • analyze
  • mealymouthed
  • monkey wrench

carnegiehall.org

May 5, 2021 -- Since it opened in 1891, Carnegie Hall has set the international standard for musical excellence as the aspirational destination for the world’s finest artists. From Tchaikovsky, Dvořák, Mahler, and Bartók to George Gershwin, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Judy Garland, and The Beatles, an honor roll of music-making artists representing the finest of every genre has filled Carnegie Hall throughout the years.

baseballhall.org

May 4, 2021 -- The professional Cincinnati Red Stockings played their first game May 4, 1869, with a 45–9 win over the Great Westerns of Cincinnati.

ushistory.org

May 3, 2021 -- Benjamin Franklin has long been credited with the invention of bifocals. Bifocals are eyeglasses with an upper and lower half, the upper for distance, and the lower for reading. Bifocals are commonly prescribed to people with presbyopia, a condition that Franklin suffered. Franklin wrote, in August 1784 to his friend George Whatley, that he was "happy in the invention of double spectacles, which serving for distant objects as well as near ones, make my eyes as useful to me as ever they were."

merriam-webster.com

April 29, 2021 -- A Way with Words (Apple)

  • upset the apple cart
  • apple of discord
  • apple of my eye
  • apple pie order

nytimes.com / Jill Krementz

April 28, 2021 -- Robert Woodruff Anderson was an American playwright, screenwriter, and theatrical producer. He received two Academy Award nominations for Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium, for the drama films The Nun's Story and I Never Sang for My Father, the latter based on his play.

  

britannica.com

April 27, 2021 -- Cecil Day-Lewis was an Anglo-Irish poet and Poet Laureate from 1968 until his death in 1972. He also wrote mystery stories under the pseudonym of Nicholas Blake.

biography.com

April 26, 2021 -- Gertrude "Ma" Rainey was an influential American blues singer and early blues recording artist. Dubbed the "Mother of the Blues", she bridged earlier vaudeville and the authentic expression of southern blues, influencing a generation of blues singers.

merriam-webster.com

April 22, 2021 -- A Way with Words (Blue!)

  • blue laws
  • blue moon
  • blue ribbon
  • blue stocking

britannica.com

April 21, 2021 -- Elizabeth II, in full Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, officially Elizabeth II, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and of her other realms and territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, (born April 21, 1926, London, England), queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from February 6, 1952. In 2015 she surpassed Victoria to become the longest-reigning monarch in British history.

firstladies.org

April 20, 2021 -- Lucretia Garfield was the First Lady of the United States from March to September 1881, as the wife of James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States. Born in Garrettsville, Ohio, Garfield first met her husband in 1849 at Geauga Seminary. After a long courtship, they married in 1858.

  

mirror.co.uk

April 19, 2021 -- Mills began her acting career as a child and was hailed as a promising newcomer, winning the BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer for her performance in the British crime drama film Tiger Bay (1959), the Academy Juvenile Award for Disney's Pollyanna (1960) and Golden Globe Award for New Star of the Year – Actress in 1961. During her early career, she appeared in six films for Walt Disney, including her dual role as twins Susan and Sharon in the Disney film The Parent Trap (1961). 

merriam-webster.com

April 15, 2021 -- A Way with Words (Black!)

  • blackout
  • black sheep
  • blackball
  • blackguard

biography.com

April 14, 2021 -- The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been described as the first modern detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his "tales of ratiocination". C. Auguste Dupin is a man in Paris who solves the mystery of the brutal murder of two women.

  

britannica.com

April 13, 2021 -- Robert LeRoy Parker, better known as Butch Cassidy, was an American train and bank robber and the leader of a gang of criminal outlaws known as the "Wild Bunch" in the Old West.

  

Goodreads

April 12, 2021 -- Madame Bovary, originally published as Madame Bovary: Provincial Manners, is the debut novel of French writer Gustave Flaubert, published in 1856. The eponymous character lives beyond her means in order to escape the banalities and emptiness of provincial life.

merriam-webster.com

April 8, 2021 -- A Way with Words (Red!)

  • red handed
  • red herring
  • red letter day
  • red tape

britannica.com

April 7, 2021 -- The Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major, Op. 55 by Ludwig van Beethoven, known as the Eroica Symphony for its supposed heroic nature. The work premiered in Vienna on April 7, 1805, and was grander and more dramatic than customary for symphonies at the time.

britannica.com

April 6, 2021 -- Isaac Asimov was an American writer and professor of biochemistry at Boston University. He was known for his works of science fiction and popular science. Asimov was a prolific writer, and wrote or edited more than 500 books. He also wrote an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. Asimov wrote hard science fiction.

  

biography.com

April 5, 2021 -- Article I, section 7 of the Constitution grants the President the authority to veto legislation passed by Congress. This authority is one of the most significant tools the President can employ to prevent the passage of legislation. President George Washington issued the first regular veto on April 5, 1792.

history.house.gov

merriam-webster.com

April 1, 2021 -- A Way with Words (Old insults)

  • churl
  • knave
  • thunderation
  • consarn it

Library of Congress

March 31, 2021 -- During World War I, in an effort to conserve fuel, Germany began observing DST on May 1, 1916. The rest of Europe soon followed. The plan was not adopted in the United States until the Standard Time Act of March 19, 1918, which confirmed the existing standard time zone system and set summer DST to begin on March 31, 1918.

biography.com

March 30, 2021 -- Warren Beatty made his debut as a tortured teenager opposite Natalie Wood in Splendor in the Grass (1961). His next big role was in Bonnie and Clyde (1967), which he also produced. The film became a colossal hit and a milestone in cinema history. Beatty was nominated for four Oscars for Heaven Can Wait and won one for directing Reds, in which he also starred. He has written, directed and starred in many films since.

britannica.com

March 29, 2021 -- Pearl Mae Bailey was an American actress and singer. After appearing in vaudeville she made her Broadway debut in St. Louis Woman in 1946. She won a Tony Award for the title role in the all-Black production of Hello, Dolly! in 1968.

  

merriam-webster.com

March 25, 2021 -- A Way with Words

Gerrymandering, in U.S. politics, the practice of drawing the boundaries of electoral districts in a way that gives one political party an unfair advantage over its rivals (political or partisan gerrymandering) or that dilutes the voting power of members of ethnic or linguistic minority groups (racial gerrymandering). The term is derived from the name of Gov. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts, whose administration enacted a law in 1812 defining new state senatorial districts.

https://www.britannica.com/

britannica.com

March 24, 2021 -- Dorothy Irene Height was an African American civil rights and women's rights activist. She focused on the issues of African American women, including unemployment, illiteracy, and voter awareness.

  

metmuseum.org

March 23, 2021 -- "Give me liberty, or give me death!" is a quotation attributed to Patrick Henry from a speech he made to the Second Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia.

IMDb

March 22, 2021 -- In a distinguished career as a supporting actor, Malden won an Academy Award for his role in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and was nominated for another, for On the Waterfront (1954). He earned an Emmy for his performance in the TV movie Fatal Vision (1984) and starred in the TV series Streets of San Francisco (1972-77). Malden has also served as president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

(infoplease.com)

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