WMKY

Eric Douglas

Eric is a native of Kanawha County and graduated from Marshall University with a degree in Journalism. He has written for newspapers and magazines throughout his career. After completing the certificate program with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, he began producing documentaries including Russia: Coming of Age, For Cheap Lobster and West Virginia Voices of War.

 

Working with FestivALL in Charleston, he has recorded more than 100 oral histories and produced a multimedia documentary of those stories called Memories of the Valley.

He is also an avid scuba diver and a former dive instructor. He has written a series of thriller novels set in locations around the world. For a change of pace, he prints his underwater photographs using the antique technique called cyanotype, also known as sun prints.

For many families in parts of eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, the absence of clean, reliable drinking water has become part of daily life.

This week on Inside Appalachia we’ll hear from folks like Blaine Taylor, a 17-year-old resident of Martin County, Kentucky, who struggles to manage basic hygiene when his water comes out with sendiment in it.

The opioid crisis is one of the biggest public health challenges in our region today. One strategy that’s been proved to help curb the epidemic’s worst effects is to implement harm reduction programs. These generally offer a variety of services but the most controversial component is often the needle exchange. Just because something is  proven effective, doesn’t mean the public has bought into the idea.

This week we’re taking an in-depth look at needle exchanges -- and what they can mean for their surrounding communities.


Inside Appalachia: Traditions Make Holiday Season Special

Dec 21, 2018

This week we’ve put together a special holiday episode about seasonal traditions. Holidays in these mountains have always been meaningful. In Appalachia, it’s usually a time to go home, or to carry on traditions of home in a new way.


Inside Appalachia: The Farmington Mine Disaster, 50 Years Later

Dec 14, 2018

On Nov. 20, 1968, an underground explosion ripped through a West Virginia coal mine and killed 78 miners. Fifty years later, the local community still comes together the Sunday before the anniversary of the Farmington Mine Disaster to remember the men lost that day.

On today’s show, we’ll hear from people who write novels, short stories and newspaper articles, each one telling Appalachia’s story in his or her own way.


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