WMKY

The Reader’s Notebook

Weekdays at 9:06 a.m. (Friday at 9:30 a.m.), 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m.

“The Reader’s Notebook” is a daily radio feature using general interest pieces, often of literary or historic significance. Topics will also include science, technology, philosophy, folklore and the arts.

The series is written and hosted by J. D. Reeder, a retired educator, historian, avid reader and regular writer, director, and performer with the Morehead Theatre Guild.

The segments air weekdays at 9:06 a.m., 12:20 p.m. and 5:44 p.m. Each segment will include vignettes about writers, artists and other noteworthy people whose birthdays or other significant events coincide with the date of the program. 

Occasionally, word and phrase origins will be explored, often with a Kentucky connection or include poems and excerpts from other writings associated with the subject of the day.  Each episode will conclude with the phrase: “Write it on your heart that every day is the best day of the year,” a quotation from noted American poet and essayist, Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Theme music for "The Reader's Notebook" provided by Todd Kozikowski ("Shadows of the Moon"/1997).

Library of Congress

August 27, 2018 -- The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883 (with origins as early as May of that year), and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera.

Poetry Foundation

August 24, 2018 -- Malcolm Cowley was an American writer, editor, historian, poet, and literary critic. He is best known for his first book of poetry, Blue Juniata (1929), and his lyrical memoir, Exile's Return (1934; revised ed. 1951), as a chronicler and fellow traveller of the Lost Generation, and as an influential editor and talent scout at Viking Press. 

britannica.com

August 23, 2018 -- British poet, critic, and editor who in his journals introduced the early work of many of the great English writers of the 1890s.

Berlin Wall Memorial

August 22, 2018 -- Ida Siekmann was a German nurse who became the first known person to die at the Berlin Wall, only nine days after the beginning of its construction. 

The New York Times

August 21, 2018 -- The theft of the most famous painting in the world on 21 August 1911 created a media sensation.

biography.com

August 20, 2018 -- Horror fiction author H.P. Lovecraft wrote short stories, novels and novellas, including "The Call of Cthulhu" and The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.

britannica.com

August 16, 2018 -- American author of the enormously popular novel Gone With the Wind (1936). The novel earned Mitchell a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, and it was the source of the classic film of the same name released in 1939.

biography.com

August 15, 2018 -- Napoléon Bonaparte was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars.

biography.com

August 14, 2018 -- William Randolph Hearst Sr. was an American businessman, politician, and newspaper publisher who built the nation's largest newspaper chain and media company Hearst Communications and whose flamboyant methods of yellow journalism influenced the nation's popular media by emphasizing sensationalism and human interest stories.

playbill.com

August 13, 2018 -- Bert Lahr was an American actor of stage and screen, vaudevillian and comedian. Lahr is best known for his role as the Cowardly Lion, as well as his counterpart Kansas farmworker Zeke, in The Wizard of Oz.

biography.com

August 10, 2018 -- Jimmy Ray Dean was an American country music singer, television host, actor, and businessman, best known today as the creator of the Jimmy Dean sausage brand as well as its TV commercials' drawling spokesman.

britannica.com

August 9, 2018 -- Izaak Walton was an English writer. Best known as the author of The Compleat Angler, he also wrote a number of short biographies that have been collected under the title of Walton's Lives.

Mormon Newsroom

August 8, 2018 -- Brigham Young was an American religious leader, politician, and settler. He was the second president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death in 1877.

biography.com

August 7, 2018 -- Ralph Johnson Bunche was an American political scientist, academic, and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Israel. He was the first African American to be so honored in the history of the prize. 

spartacus-educational.com

August 6, 2018 -- John Middleton Murry was an English writer. He was a prolific author, producing more than 60 books and thousands of essays and reviews on literature, social issues, politics, and religion during his lifetime.

The New York Times

August 3, 2018 -- James MacGregor Burns was an American historian and political scientist, presidential biographer, and authority on leadership studies

biography.com

August 2, 2018 -- Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi was a French sculptor who is best known for designing Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty.

britroyals.com

August 1, 2018 -- George I was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 and ruler of the Duchy and Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698 until his death.

pbs.org

July 31, 2018 -- Leader of perhaps the most savage fighting unit in the Civil War, William Quantrill developed a style of guerrilla warfare that terrorized civilians and soldiers alike. By late 1861, he was the leader of Quantrill's Raiders, a small force of no more than a dozen men who harassed Union soldiers and sympathizers along the Kansas-Missouri border and often clashed with Jayhawkers, the pro-Union guerrilla bands that reversed Quantrill's tactics by staging raids from Kansas into Missouri.

Baseball Hall of Fame

July 30, 2018 -- Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel was an American Major League Baseball right fielder and manager best known as the manager of both the championship New York Yankees of the 1950s, and later of the hapless expansion New York Mets.

history.com

June 15, 2018 -- Rachel Jackson was the wife of Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States. She lived with him at their home at The Hermitage, where she died just days after his election and before his inauguration in 1829—therefore she never served as First Lady, a role assumed by her niece, Emily Donelson.

military.com

June 14, 2018 -- In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777 by resolution of the Second Continental Congress.

britannica.com

June 13, 2018 -- Fanny Burney was an English novelist and letter writer, who was the author of Evelina, a landmark in the development of the novel of manners.

biography.com

June 12, 2018 -- Charles Kingsley was a broad church priest of the Church of England, a university professor, social reformer, historian and novelist.

cousteau.org

June 11, 2018 -- Jacques-Yves Cousteau was a French naval officer, explorer, conservationist, filmmaker, innovator, scientist, photographer, author and researcher who studied the sea and all forms of life in water.

June 8, 2018 -- Brian Coffey was an Irish poet and publisher. His work was informed by his Catholicism, his background in science and philosophy, and his connection to surrealism.

biography.com

June 7, 2018 -- Jessica Tandy was a British stage and film actress. She appeared in over 100 stage productions and had more than 60 roles in film and TV.

scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk

June 6, 2018 -- Tom Scott was a Scottish poet, editor, and prose writer. His writing is closely tied to the New Apocalypse, the New Romantics, and the Scottish Renaissance. Scott was born in Glasgow, Scotland.

Public Domain

June 5, 2018 -- Elena Cornaro Piscopia was a Venetian philosopher of noble descent, who was one of the first women to receive an academic degree from a university and in 1678 she became the first woman in the world to receive a Ph.D. degree.  

The Telegraph

June 4, 2018 -- George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820.

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